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Getting Started with Solitary Bees

Getting Started with Solitary Bees

Different species use different diameter nesting cavities, so make sure to have the correct size if you desire a specific bee species. In general, spring mason bees prefer ≈ 8mm diameter cavities, while summer leafcutter bees prefer ≈ 6mm diameter cavities. Alternatively, place various sizes in your bee house to see what native cavity-nesting species live in your area!

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Mason Bee Beginners Guide

Mason Bee Beginners Guide

Mason bees are cavity-nesting solitary bees, meaning they build their nests inside pre-made nesting cavities. They spend most of their lifetime inside these cavities and emerge from their cocoons as fully mature bees. You can help keep solitary bee populations healthy by providing adequate pollen and nectar sources and using nesting materials that are easy to open and clean, like wood trays or natural reeds.

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How to Care for Mason bees

How to Care for Mason Bees

A mason bee is a type of solitary bee – the kind that doesn’t swarm, sting, or set up a massive hive. Solitary bees don’t produce honey, either, which means they aren’t in a fuss over defending their turf. This is great news for people allergic to or afraid of beestings. Because mason bees aren’t prone to sting, they’re a great little bee species for raising in the backyard.

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What are Solitary Cavity-Nesting Bees

What are Solitary Cavity-Nesting Bees

Cavity-nesting bees build their nests inside tunnels left behind by insects, in the hollow stems of certain plants, and artificial bee houses and hotels. Most cavity-nesting bee species don't cause damage to your deck or home because they nest in pre-made holes instead of boring into wood.

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5 Benefits of Raising Solitary Bees

5 Benefits of Raising Solitary Bees

As their name suggests, solitary bees are solo creatures – which means they aren’t submitted to the same pressure of protecting a communal hive as seen with honeybees or wasps. In fact, solitary bees are extremely uninterested in attacking intruders or defending their turf.

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